Prof. Sven Ingebrandt joins the Aachen Graphene & 2D Materials Center

The Aachen Graphene & 2D Materials center has gained a new member: Prof. Sven Ingebrandt, head of the Chair for Micro- and Nanosystems and of the Institute of Materials in Electrical Engineering 1 (IWE 1) at RWTH Aachen University.

Professor Sven Ingebrandt.

The research interests of Prof. Ingebrandt focus on development of micro- and nanosystems for biomedicine and life sciences, as well as for environmental sensing and industry 4.0 applications. “2D materials are a very promising platform for sensors in general and for bioelectronics in particular”, says Prof. Ingebrandt. “Their unique mechanical and opto-electronical properties and their ultimately scaled surface-to-volume ratio enable new generations of biosensors and of “intelligent” medical implants. It is an exciting research field full of opportunities and challenges. In my group, we are currently investigating graphene and graphene-oxide as transducer materials for biosensors. With the help and the strong expertise of the colleagues in the Center, we aim to expand our activities to other 2D materials and hetero-layers.”  

“I am very happy to welcome officially Prof. Ingebrandt into Center”, says Prof. Max Lemme, spokesperson of the Aachen Graphene & 2D Materials Center. “Prof. Ingebrandt brings new expertise and new research lines into our portfolio. Two-dimensional materials are an extremely versatile class of materials – it is beautiful to see this versatility reflected also into the many different research directions pursued at the Center.”

More information on Chair for Micro- and Nanosystems and of the Institute of Materials in Electrical Engineering 1 (IWE 1).

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